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ba
Major (سرگرد)
I watch it until minute five.When five bastards in heavy armor start beating one kid.First I was so pissed off when i so this video.Most of this assholes who are attacking Bahrain people are mercenaries from Pakistan.They got 30 thousand dollars up front and than another twenty when they do their job.Nice work they are paid by Zionist family to kill they own Muslim brothers.Their mother must be very proud of them.BUT when it comes to UN help we can all have a good lough.It is public knowledge that American and British firms are selling weapons,tear gas and other instruments to torture Bahrain people to this Al Khalifa family.And what UN did?Ban Ki Moon probably had a good lough.The only help to Bahrain people can come from Iran and from nowhere else.BUT it is a big question do  they wont a help from Iran?I remember one year ago on CNN i watch one of the leaders of Bahrain freedom movement(I cant remember his name)and he said that they do not need Iran:he said that they want democracy and do not want Islamic republic like Iran.Not to mention that party headquarters are in London.And other this Al Wefaq what is their official stance?Their leader was educated in Qom but I do not seen him affiliated to Iran very much.I am just trying to say that is not like Iran did not do anything to help Bahrain.Iran have ability and military force to do that but maybe it just was not invited to help?Do we have some member here from Bahrain here to explain it better?

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np
S.M. Sergeant (استوار دوم)
I cried so hard while watching this video. We need to help our brothers and sisters in Bahrain. Marg bar Saudis and Bahrain
 government. Where is UN to see these inhuman acts. We need to help them.

Sorry for making anybody sad. But I feel that I had to show this so everybody could see whats really going on. Like Berislac said the most of this bastard are pakis or saudi scums.
What make me most angry is that when we had some "demonstrations" and riots in Iran the whole world was talking about how many ppl has died, but in reality it was just that Neda (if it wasan´t fake or she just was victim of zionist spies) and some other idiots (rip).. But here in Bahrain you can see real images of dead youngsters, see how cops (that are there for protecting the ppl and society) is stealing from ordinary ppl, how they beat and kill innocent ppl.
I have always hated the cops (maybe just cuz I have always been in the wrong side of the law) but in this case it make me mad, cuz you dont hear anything about it on the news, only about how Assad kills syrian and you dont see shit about it, not one pict or video of dead syrians only lies on media or propaganda videos. One want to do the same thing whit this bastards.

Nothing would make me more happy than see saudi arabia go down. So long they exist it will be oki for other muslim countries to be a puppet/slave under the Usraeil/west... I would love to kill saudis with my own hands...
You are once again threatened my beloved homeland,
I shall defend you until the last breath,
We embrace death if that's what it takes to save you, we have lived by Bushido code all along.
Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 04:33:53 PM by Nonbarbari

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T. Sergeant (گروهبان دو
brathran we should not  forget that we have seen such scenes in our own country during imposed war .... now that same Iraq is ruled  by Our country ... Just wait and see ... its just a matter of time before we see bahrain liberated too . Its just a matter of time ... we r not going anywhere ....
Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 11:24:02 PM by Emirzaad

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ir
Major (سرگرد)
Quote
WARNING Extreme graphic... But a most C...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=btZZfIEP684#!


It's unbelievable... Where is the hypocrite Arab League now? Where is NATO? The same west that is focusing all day on Syria, turns strangely silent when it comes to the corrupt Al Khalifa or Saud monarchies, which were brought to power by the west which protects them from their own people.

But the Bahreini people shall be victorious, inshallah. And they will remember the US / EU for what they are, ie a bunch of oppressive imperial powers with the blood of millions on their hands. Down with the wahhabi lackeys, and down with their foreign masters!

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Major (سرگرد)
Great comment by a viewer of the video:

Quote
and arabs are still calling for nato intervention in syria, they dont understand that those people dont give A SHIT about you or your life. its about politics and bahrain cannot be de-stabilized, they are to important for the imperial war-machine.

are tell me, why are videos like this comming from bahrain yet there isnt a SINGLE VIDEO showing syrian troops doing the alledged killings?

its a fucking sick joke and people dont get it. fucking dogs act more human then these murderers

br0dskalk 2 weeks ago 11

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Defender of Justice
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ir
2nd Brig. general (سرتیب دوم)
very saddening video...

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"Shia's are first Loyal to the Islamic Republic"
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vi
Private (سرباز عادى)
surprised no one posted regarding the huge rally that took place this Friday.........Watched it Live on PressTV but was wondering, if anyone could post link that video here and also some pictures of his protest......

Me behind firewall :-(( need to inform people that are uninformed...........

Bahrain's Shias demand reform at mass rally

Tens of thousands march along a main road near capital after sermon from leading Shia cleric urging greater democracy.
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2012 02:34

 


Tens of thousands of Bahrainis demonstrated in Budaiya to demand democratic reforms [Reuters]
The protesters began marching along a main road near the city on Friday in response to a call from leading Shia cleric Sheikh Isa Qassim who urged people to renew their calls for greater democracy.

Tens of thousands of Bahrainis have demonstrated outside the capital Manama to demand political reforms, a year after the Gulf Arab state crushed an uprising, witnesses said.

A live blog showed images of the protesters carrying banners denouncing "dictatorship" and demanding the release of detainees.

"We are here for the sake of our just demands that we cannot make concessions over and we stick with them because we have sacrificed for them," Qassim said before the march, during his weekly sermon in the Shia village of Diraz.

He had promised to personally lead the march, his most high-profile action in more than a year of unrest.

'Biggest demonstration'

A photographer with the Reuters news agency said the main Budaiya road in the area of Diraz, and Saar, west of Manama was packed, just one hour before the protest was set to begin.


Egyptian human rights expert, Mahmoud Sherif Basyouni on his report.

"It is the biggest demonstration in the past year. I would say it could be over 100,000," he said.

Nabeel Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, told Al Jazeera by phone from Manama that "thousands of security forces" had been deployed to close down roads leading to the protest site.

"The message is that people are not happy with the government. We have clear demands: an elected government, a parliament with power, an end to sectarian discrimination, a clear redistribution of wealth and power and all demands guaranteed by the international convention on human rights," he said.

Rajab added that Friday's protests were "the biggest in our history".

Independent inquiry

The country's majority Shia population were in the forefront of last year's protest movement in Bahrain, which erupted in February after uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia.
 
The Sunni Muslim ruling Al Khalifa family crushed the protests one month later, imposing a period of martial law and bringing in Saudi and United Arab Emirates troops to restore order.

An independent commission of inquiry, formed and funded by Bahrain's government, investigated the protests in February and March 2011.

The commission found that "Thirty-five deaths occurred between February 14 and April 15, 2011 that have been linked to the events of February and March 2011. The deaths of 19 of these civilians have been attributed to security forces."

Among other findings, the commission reported that "Many detainees were subjected to torture and other forms of physical and psychological abuse while in custody".

Bahrain, where the US Fifth Fleet is based, has remained mired in crisis and Shia youths clash daily with riot police.

The unrest has slowed the economy in what was a major tourism and banking hub in the Gulf region.

Riyadh's influence

Tension has risen in recent weeks around the February 14 anniversary of the uprising, with security forces maintaining a tight grip on the traffic intersection that protesters originally occupied.

Pro-government Sunni groups have organised counter rallies, warning the authorities not to enter into a dialogue on reforms that could give the elected parliament legislative clout and the power to form governments.
 
Those groups look to Sunni power Saudi Arabia as a key ally and say the opposition is loyal to Shia Iran, a charge the opposition parties deny. Analysts say Riyadh does not want Bahrain to agree to reforms that empower Shias.

Qassim said Friday's march would show how strong the opposition was.

"The march will either prove you are only an isolated minority making demands, or that the demands are widely
popular," he said in his sermon, which was posted on YouTube.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2012/03/201239144334860869.html
A 17 episode documentary by Al Manar titled 'If Hizbollah Was Defeated...'

This doc takes a very academic and scientific approach to Hizbollah's military tactics, strategy, school of thought etc.

A MUST WATCH for Military Enthusiast

http://www.iranmilitaryforum.net/cinema-and-entertainment/dedicated-hezballah-video-thread/msg213452/#msg213452



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T. Sergeant (گروهبان دو
whats beautiful abt bahraini uprising is that unlike Lybia and Suriye western backed  rebels the bahraini protestors havnt took  up arms  yet nor do they have any foreign backing   ... I although am not a gandhi like peace bird ...

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"Shia's are first Loyal to the Islamic Republic"
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Private (سرباز عادى)
Bahrain protesters boost pressure with huge rally

Opposition leaders estimate the crowd at nearly 100,000; small breakaway groups driven back by tear gas
APPublished: 19:07 March 9, 2012


Manama, Bahrain: Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters flooded a major highway in Bahrain on Friday in one of the largest opposition rallies in months.
 
Security forces fired tear gas at smaller groups attempting to reach a heavily guarded square that was once the protest hub.

The main procession was mostly peaceful, but breakaway groups were driven back by tear gas as they headed toward Pearl Square, which was the centre of the protests for weeks last year until it was stormed by security forces.

The march stretched for kilometres. Some opposition leaders estimated the crowd at nearly 100,000, which would make it one of the largest protest gatherings since the street rallies erupted in February 2011.

Organisers said the march would end at a site called Freedom Square outside Bahrain's capital, Manama. Police reinforcements were sent to keep protesters from any attempts to shift toward Pearl Square, which is now ringed by razor wire and under 24-hour watch.

http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/bahrain/bahrain-protesters-boost-pressure-with-huge-rally-1.992301

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S. Sergeant (گروهبان سو


Enjoy

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Master Sergeant (گروهبان)
“Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest.”

 Mahatma Ghandi

whats beautiful abt bahraini uprising is that unlike Lybia and Suriye western backed  rebels the bahraini protestors havnt took  up arms  yet nor do they have any foreign backing   ... I although am not a gandhi like peace bird ...
“I searched for God among the Christians and on the Cross and therein I found Him not. I went into the ancient temples of idolatry; no trace of Him was there. I entered the mountain cave of Hira and then went as far as Qandhar but God I found not. With set purpose I fared to the summit of Mount Caucasus and found there only 'anqa's habitation. Then I directed my search to the Kaaba, the resort of old and young; God was not there even. Turning to philosophy I inquired about him from ibn Sina but found Him not within his range. I fared then to the scene of the Prophet's experience of a great divine manifestation only a "two bow-lengths' distance from him" but God was not there even in that exalted court. Finally, I looked into my own heart and there I saw Him; He was nowhere else.”

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Lieutenant General (سپهبد)
Bahrain police battle to control streets in flashpoint town



Andrew Hammond Reuters

5:14 p.m. CDT, March 24, 2012

SITRA, Bahrain (Reuters) - Bahraini police clashed with anti-government protesters on Saturday at a Shi'ite town where residents tried to demonstrate against the Gulf Arab state's holding of a Formula One race next month.

Hundreds of riot police backed by dark blue armored vehicles and jeeps patrolled the streets of Sitra, a poor district southeast of Manama where youths threw petrol bombs and stones at security forces who responded with tear gas canisters, Reuters witnesses said.

    Related
    Bahrain police battle to control streets in flashpoint town
    Anti-government protester waves Bahrain's national flag during clashes with riot police in Bahrain Anti-government protester waves Bahrain's national flag during clashes with riot police in Bahrain

    An anti-government protester throws a Molotov cocktail at riot policemen and their armoured personnel carrier during clashes in the district of Sitra An anti-government protester throws a Molotov cocktail at riot policemen and their armoured personnel carrier during clashes in the district of Sitra


Sitra has long been a flashpoint area where Shi'ite Muslim youths vent anger against a government they feel marginalizes them politically and economically.

The Sunni-led government blames Shi'ite clerics for the communal conflict, saying they had turned people against the state and incited Shi'ites to raise the temperature on the streets ahead of the race.

Anger on the streets of Sitra rose each time patrols had passed and residents taunted security forces by shouting from inside houses, banging on trash bins and honking horns.

"Come here, you immigrants", youths shouted, referring to foreign Sunni Muslim hires working with riot police. Some chanted against the island's ruler, King Hamad.

"You know, it's been going on like this for 30 years, and they still don't want to give us our rights," said Ali Mansour, a 45-year-old taxi driver sheltering with his wife in a car as fumes began to seep in from more canisters that landed nearby.

Bahrain has been bitterly divided since its Shi'ite majority led protests last year for reforms they hope would reduce the powers of the ruling Al Khalifa family, give parliament legislative clout and bring opposition figures into government.

Some called for ditching the monarchy altogether, angering many Sunnis who view the royal family as a force for good and protection against Shi'ite empowerment.

The authorities crushed the protest movement, which was inspired by revolts that brought down entrenched rulers in Egypt and Tunisia, by imposing a period of martial law and bringing in Saudi and other Gulf Arab troops to help win back control of the streets.

But over a year later, ongoing unrest - with clashes in Shi'ite villages and large opposition party marches - has damaged Bahrain's economy and alarmed Western allies.

They view Bahrain as an important ally in their standoff with Iran over its nuclear program but want the government to resolve the conflict by reaching a deal with the opposition.

A U.N. rights body this week expressed concern over the use of excessive force and tear gas by Bahraini security forces.

ANTI-GOVERNMENT HOTSPOT

Sitra is covered in anti-government graffiti describing the king as a tyrant and glorifying imprisoned community leaders. One poster cited a condemnation by Iran's leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of the concept of kingship as un-Islamic.

Many streets are strewn with concrete blocks, pieces of wood and trash bins to stop police cars moving into the back alleys.

King Hamad took power in 1999 and vowed to restore parliament and introduce democratic reforms, receiving a rapturous welcome in 2001. He freed prisoners after taking office but came under pressure to introduce further reforms following last year's protests.

Now Bahrain's Formula One Grand Prix on April 20-22 has become embroiled in the troubles, as opposition groups vow to step up protests. Police pulled down posters on the walls in Sitra saying "No Formula 1 in Bahrain".

"They are paying a lot for Formula One, while people are dying every day," said Mirza Rabia, 41, a government employee.

Activists say at least 33 people have died since June amid daily clashes in Shi'ite districts, as the government tries to lock protesters in to stop any renewed mass movement in Manama.

Police question the causes of death and their attribution to the conflict. They say they are showing restraint in the face of violent youth challenging state authority.

"We are the government and these guys are scum. Molotov cocktails are not peaceful, they make it rain with molotovs," said a police corporal who declined to be named.

He said it was difficult to imagine integrating people from Shi'ite communities into the police force - a key recommendation from former Miami police chief John Timoney who is advising the interior ministry on improving conduct.

(Writing by Andrew Hammond; editing by Sami Aboudi and Samia Nakhoul)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-bahrain-clashesbre82n0el-20120324,0,2898538.story

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Lieutenant General (سپهبد)
Bahrain Shi'ites battle police at protester's funeral, 8 held



Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:50pm IST

* Police bombarded with petrol bombs, stones

* Opposition say police start violence with tear gas volley

* Turmoil persists in U.S.-Saudi Gulf ally against Iran

DUBAI, Aug 22 (Reuters) - Protesters pelted police with petrol bombs and stones in clashes that broke out in Bahrain on Tuesday night at the funeral for a teenage demonstrator killed last week in a new bout of unrest

in the U.S.-allied Gulf state.

Police arrested eight protesters, the government said. The opposition accused the security forces of provoking the violence by firing tear gas.

Bahrain, where the U.S. Fifth Fleet is based, has been in crisis since a revolt led by majority Shi'ite Muslims began 18 months ago to demand democracy in the Sunni-ruled kingdom.

The government has denounced the protest movement, inspired by uprisings elsewhere in the Arab world, as sectarian and a part of a quest by Shi'ite Iran to dominate the region. Bahraini Shi'ites deny being steered from Tehran.

The violence broke out the funeral of 16-year-old Hussam al-Haddad, who was killed on Friday by police gunfire.

"A group of rioters bombarded police with Molotov cocktails and stones from the roof of a religious centre," a government statement said.

"Another group attempted to block several roads, while still others began an illegal rally on a busy road," it said, adding that eight people had been arrested.

The main opposition Wefaq party said riot police started the violence by firing tear gas at those mourning Haddad.

"Many injuries were reported as the regime forces opened fire at mourners," Wefaq said. "As usual, the regime forces backed the militias who took part in attacking the mourners."

Authorities issue permits for protests but have not granted any since June. Wefaq and witnesses said police set up roadblocks to prevent people attending the funeral, which was held on the island of al-Muharraq.

The disturbances followed the arrest of 11 people on Monday evening during clashes with riot police in the capital Manama and Hamad Town.

SHOTGUN PELLETS

Opposition activists said Haddad was also beaten by plainclothes agents. The Interior Ministry said the death resulted from police reacting in self-defence to a petrol bomb attack on a patrol.

Haddad's death was the first in the unrest since April, when a man was found on a rooftop covered in shotgun pellet wounds after clashes with police the night before.

The Shi'ite-led opposition says more than 45 people have been killed in protests since June 2011, when the government lifted martial law it had imposed to help quash the uprising.

They also say hundreds of people have been arrested since the government said in April it would crack down on protesters who skirmished with police. The Interior Ministry has not said how many people are now in detention.

Bahraini authorities say more than 700 police officers have been hurt in clashes and that the police, who have not used live fire, have been exercising restraint. Opposition activists say the police are anything but restrained.

The opposition's central demand is for the elected parliament to have full powers to legislate and form governments.

King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa has approved constitutional reforms that give the assembly more powers of scrutiny over ministers and budgets.

The government and political parties have held low-key, inconclusive talks on how to end the turmoil.

Bahrain is an important card in a regional competition for predominance between Iran and U.S.-backed Saudi Arabia.

U.S. warships from the Fifth Fleet help ensure oil exports flow freely out of the Gulf, while Iran has threatened a blockade if its protracted stand-off with Western powers over its disputed nuclear programme deteriorates into conflict.

Underscoring the high geopolitical stakes in Bahrain, Saudi and United Arab Emirates troops intervened in March 2011 to help the Al Khalifas contain the revolt, a move that caused a rupture in Manama's relations with Iran.

http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/08/22/bahrain-unrest-idINL6E8JM5F820120822

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ir
2nd lieutenant (ستوان دوم)
Every member of the government of Bahrain along with their Saudi's pimp should be executed for the crimes against humanity

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Best devotion to Allah is not to make show of it.
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Lieutenant colonel (سرهنگ دوم)
"Thousands join peaceful protest in Bahrain "

Warning, the news organization is financed by West and Qatari Puppet.

Tens of thousands of people chanting anti-government slogans and holding up pictures of jailed activists have taken part in Bahrain's first authorised opposition protest since June.

No clashes occurred at Friday's march along a three kilometre stretch of a highway west of the capital Manama.

Protesters carried Bahraini flags and held up images of rights activist and protest leader Nabeel Rajab, calling for his release.

Bahrain, where the US Fifth Fleet is based, has been in crisis since a revolt led by majority Shia Muslims began 18 months ago to demand democracy in the Sunni-ruled kingdom.

Speaking to Al Jazeera from Bahrain, journalist Reem Khalifa said that since protests started, "It has never been quiet ... especially in the over-populated Shia areas".

"Every day there is tension in various areas around the island,” Khalifa said.

The government has denounced the protest movement, inspired by uprisings elsewhere in the Arab world, as sectarian.

This claim denied by protesters who say they face discrimination from the ruling Sunni minority.

The rally, under the banner "Democratic Freedom" and organised by opposition groups led by the biggest bloc, al-Wefaq, was the first since the interior ministry banned Wefaq-led marches in June, saying these had ended in violence.

Since the ban, protests have continued in villages around the country.

Joe Stork of Human Rights Watch's Middle East division, told Al Jazeera that while he would give the Gulf nation's human rights record "a very bad review", he believes concern over the nation's tarnished image is "having an impact".

"It's also true that some members of the government are very sensitive to their international image. They're concerned about their reputation that Bahrain has gotten over the last couple of years as a place that doesn't tolerate any peaceful dissent," said Stork from Washington.

On Aug 22, protesters pelted police with petrol bombs and stones at the funeral of a teenage demonstrator killed by police gunfire the previous week.

Rajab was sentenced two weeks ago to three years in prison on three counts of leading illegal protests, a verdict that drew criticism from Washington."

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2012/08/2012831212940407882.html

I think West really got scared of the prospect of US losing its base in Bahrain. The violent crackdown not only had failed to scare people off the street, it also encouraged people to defend themselves. The puppet of Bahrain thinks that allowing demonstration will role back the clock and he can stay in power by minor reforms. He does not realize the he has lost all legitimacy and nothing short of fleeing the country can save his miserable life.

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3rd lieutenant (ستوان سوم)
Why didn't CNN's international arm air its own documentary on Bahrain's Arab Spring repression?

In late March 2011, as the Arab Spring was spreading, CNN sent a four-person crew to Bahrain to produce a one-hour documentary on the use of internet technologies and social media by democracy activists in the region. Featuring on-air investigative correspondent Amber Lyon, the CNN team had a very eventful eight-day stay in that small, US-backed kingdom.

By the time the CNN crew arrived, many of the sources who had agreed to speak to them were either in hiding or had disappeared. Regime opponents whom they interviewed suffered recriminations, as did ordinary citizens who worked with them as fixers. Leading human rights activist Nabeel Rajab was charged with crimes shortly after speaking to the CNN team. A doctor who gave the crew a tour of his village and arranged meetings with government opponents, Saeed Ayyad, had his house burned to the ground shortly after. Their local fixer was fired ten days after working with them.

The CNN crew itself was violently detained by regime agents in front of Rajab's house. As they described it after returning to the US, "20 heavily-armed men", whose faces were "covered with black ski masks", "jumped from military vehicles", and then "pointed machine guns at" the journalists, forcing them to the ground. The regime's security forces seized their cameras and deleted their photos and video footage, and then detained and interrogated them for the next six hours.

Lyon's experience both shocked and emboldened her. The morning after her detention, newspapers in Bahrain prominently featured articles about the incident containing what she said were "outright fabrications" from the government. "It made clear just how willing the regime is to lie," she told me in a phone interview last week.

But she also resolved to expose just how abusive and thuggish the regime had become in attempting to snuff out the burgeoning democracy movement, along with any negative coverage of the government.

"I realized there was a correlation between the amount of media attention activists receive and the regime's ability to harm them, so I felt an obligation to show the world what our sources, who risked their lives to talk to us, were facing."

CNN's total cost for the documentary, ultimately titled "iRevolution: Online Warriors of the Arab Spring", was in excess of $100,000, an unusually high amount for a one-hour program of this type. The portion Lyon and her team produced on Bahrain ended up as a 13-minute segment in the documentary. That segment, which as of now is available on YouTube, is a hard-hitting and unflinching piece of reporting that depicts the regime in a very negative light.

In the segment, Lyon interviewed activists as they explicitly described their torture at the hands of government forces, while family members recounted their relatives' abrupt disappearances. She spoke with government officials justifying the imprisonment of activists. And the segment featured harrowing video footage of regime forces shooting unarmed demonstrators, along with the mass arrests of peaceful protesters. In sum, the early 2011 CNN segment on Bahrain presented one of the starkest reports to date of the brutal repression embraced by the US-backed regime.

On 19 June 2011 at 8pm, CNN's domestic outlet in the US aired "iRevolution" for the first and only time. The program received prestigious journalism awards, including a 2012 Gold Medal from New York Festival's Best TV and Films. Lyon, along with her segment producer Taryn Fixel, were named as finalists for the 2011 Livingston Awards for Young Journalists. A Facebook page created by Bahraini activists, entitled "Thank you Amber Lyon, CNN reporter | From people of Bahrain", received more than 8,000 "likes".

Despite these accolades, and despite the dangers their own journalists and their sources endured to produce it, CNN International (CNNi) never broadcast the documentary. Even in the face of numerous inquiries and complaints from their own employees inside CNN, it continued to refuse to broadcast the program or even provide any explanation for the decision. To date, this documentary has never aired on CNNi.

CNNi's refusal to broadcast 'iRevolution'

It is CNN International that is, by far, the most-watched English-speaking news outlet in the Middle East. By refusing to broadcast "iRevolution", the network's executives ensured it was never seen on television by Bahrainis or anyone else in the region.

CNNi's decision not to broadcast "iRevolution" was extremely unusual. Both CNN and CNNi have had severe budget constraints imposed on them over the last several years. One long-time CNN employee (to whom I have granted anonymity to avoid repercussions for negative statements about CNN's management) described "iRevolution" as an "expensive, highly produced international story about the Arab Spring". Because the documentary was already paid for by CNN, it would have been "free programming" for CNNi to broadcast, making it "highly unusual not to air it". The documentary "was made with an international audience as our target", said Lyon. None of it was produced on US soil. And its subject matter was squarely within the crux of CNN International's brand.

CNNi's refusal to broadcast "iRevolution" soon took on the status of a mini-scandal among its producers and reporters, who began pushing Lyon to speak up about this decision. In June 2011, one long-time CNN news executive emailed Lyon:

"Why would CNNi not run a documentary on the Arab Spring, arguably the the biggest story of the decade? Strange, no?"

Motivated by the concerns expressed by long-time CNN journalists, Lyon requested a meeting with CNNi's president, Tony Maddox, to discuss the refusal to broadcast the documentary. On 24 June 2011, she met with Maddox, who vowed to find out and advise her of the reasons for its non-airing. He never did.

In a second meeting with Maddox, which she had requested in early December to follow up on her unanswered inquiry, Lyon was still given no answers. Instead, at that meeting, Maddox, according to Lyon, went on the offense, sternly warning her not to speak publicly about this matter. Several times, Maddox questioned her about this 18 November 2011 tweet by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, demanding to know what prompted it:

When I asked CNN to comment on Maddox's meetings with Lyon, they declined to respond on specific details and said he was not available for interview. Instead, they made the following statement:

"The documentary 'iRevolution' was commissioned for CNN US. While the programme did not air in full on CNN International, segments of it were shown. This differing use of content is normal across our platforms, and such decisions are taken for purely editorial reasons. CNN International has run more than 120 stories on Bahrain over the past six months, a large number of which were critical in tone and all of which meet the highest journalistic standards."

Despite Lyon's being stonewalled by CNNi, she said facts began emerging that shined considerable light on the relationship between the regime in Bahrain and CNNi when it came to "iRevolution". Upon returning from Bahrain in April, Lyon appeared on CNN several times to recount her own detention by security forces and to report on ongoing brutality by the regime against its own citizens, even including doctors and nurses providing medical aid to protesters. She said she did not want to wait for the documentary's release to alert the world to what was taking place.

In response, according to both the above-cited CNN employee and Lyon, the regime's press officers complained repeatedly to CNNi about Lyon generally and specifically her reporting for "iRevolution". In April, a senior producer emailed her to say:

"We are dealing with blowback from Bahrain govt on how we violated our mission, etc."

"It became a standard joke around the office: the Bahrainis called to complain about you again," recounted Lyon. Lyon was also told by CNN employees stationed in the region that "the Bahrainis also sent delegations to our Abu Dhabi bureau to discuss the coverage."

Internal CNN emails reflect continuous pressure on Lyon and others to include claims from the Bahraini regime about the violence in their country – even when, says Lyon, she knew first-hand that the claims were false. One April 2011 email to Lyon from a CNN producer demands that she include in her documentary a line stating that "Bahrain's foreign minister says security forces are not firing on unarmed civilians," and another line describing regime claims accusing "activists like Nabeel Rajab of doctoring photos … fabricating injuries".

Having just returned from Bahrain, Lyon says she "saw first-hand that these regime claims were lies, and I couldn't believe CNN was making me put what I knew to be government lies into my reporting."

Bahrain's PR offensive

As negative news stories of its brutal repression grew in the wake of the Arab Spring, the regime undertook a massive, very well-funded PR campaign to improve its image. As reported by Bahrain Watch, the regime has spent more than $32m in PR fees alone since the commencement of the Arab Spring in February, 2011, including payments to some of Washington, DC's most well-connected firms and long-time political operatives, such as former Howard Dean campaign manager Joe Trippi.

One of the largest contracts the regime had was with the DC-based PR firm Qorvis Communications. As Time reported last November, the firm, which also does extensive PR work for Bahrain's close allies, the Saudi regime, "has a branch dedicated to rehabilitating the reputation of unsavory governments, a niche practice that has seen great demand in the wake of the Arab spring".

Qorvis often led the way in complaining to CNNi about its Bahrain coverage. An internal email from CNN at the beginning of 2012, seen by the Guardian, records the firm's calling to complain about excessively favorable mentions of Nabeel Rajab, who had been arrested and charged over an anti-regime tweet, and was just this month sentenced to three years in prison for an "illegal demonstration".

The long-time CNN employee said that "iRevolution" was vetted far more heavily than the typical documentary:

"Because Amber was relatively new in reporting on the region, and especially because of the vocal complaints from the Bahrainis, the documentary was heavily scrutinized. But nobody could ever point to anything factually or journalistically questionable in Amber's reporting on Bahrain."

In response to several inquiries, Bahrain's Information Affairs Authority refused to say whether they had complained to CNNi about Lyon and "iRevolution". A spokesman, Fahad A AlBinali, instead offered only a generic statement that "on occasion we contact media outlets to provide correct information or a balanced view of the subject," and, he claimed, when doing so, they are simply trying "to help ensure that coverage of Bahrain is accurate and unbiased". Subsequent attempts to obtain specific answers from the authority about the regime's complaints to CNNi about "iRevolution" and Lyon went unanswered.

After Lyon's crew returned from Bahrain, CNN had no correspondents regularly reporting on the escalating violence. In emails to her producers and executives, Lyon repeatedly asked to return to Bahrain. Her requests were denied, and she was never sent back. She thus resorted to improvising coverage by interviewing activists via Skype in an attempt, she said, "to keep Bahrain in the news".

In March 2012, Lyon was laid off from CNN as part of an unrelated move by the network to outsource its investigative documentaries. Now at work on a book, Lyon began in August to make reference to "iRevolution" on her Twitter account, followed by more than 20,000 people.

On 16 August, Lyon wrote three tweets about this episode. CNNi's refusal to broadcast "iRevolution", she wrote, "baffled producers". Linking to the YouTube clip of the Bahrain segment, she added that the "censorship was devastating to my crew and activists who risked lives to tell [the] story." She posted a picture of herself with Rajab and wrote:

"A proponent of peace, @nabeelrajab risked his safety to show me how the regime oppresses the [people] of #Bahrain."

The following day, a representative of CNN's business affairs office called Lyon's acting agent, George Arquilla of Octagon Entertainment, and threatened that her severance payments and insurance benefits would be immediately terminated if she ever again spoke publicly about this matter, or spoke negatively about CNN.

When I asked CNN specifically about this alleged threat delivered to Lyon's agent, the company declined to confirm or deny it, commenting:

"In common with other companies we do not discuss internal personnel matters."

Responding to Lyon's charge of censorship, CNN's spokesman replied:

"CNN International has a proud record of courageous, independent and honest reporting from around the world. Any suggestion that the network's relationship with any country has influenced our reporting is wholly and demonstrably wrong."

It is true that CNNi can point to numerous recent reports describing the violence against protesters by the regime in Bahrain. Given the scope of the violence, and how widely it has now been reported elsewhere, it would be virtually impossible for CNNi never to broadcast such reports while still maintaining any claim to credibility. But such reports required far more journalistic courage to air in the first half of 2011, when so few knew of the brutality to which the regime had resorted, than now, when it is widely known. Moreover, CNNi's reports on the violence in Bahrain take a much more muted tone than when it reports on regimes disfavored by the US, such as Iran or Syria.

More importantly, the tidal wave of CNNi's partnerships and associations with the regime in Bahrain, and the hagiography it has broadcast about it (see the accompanying commentary on the relationship between the network and the regime), appear to have overwhelmed any truly critical coverage.

But CNN's threat had the opposite effect to what was intended. Lyon insists she never signed any confidentiality or non-disclosure agreement with CNN in any case, but she is sanguine about any risk to her severance package. "At this point," Lyon said, "I look at those payments as dirty money to stay silent. I got into journalism to expose, not help conceal, wrongdoing, and I'm not willing to keep quiet about this any longer, even if it means I'll lose those payments."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/04/cnn-international-documentary-bahrain-arab-spring-repression

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moores law driving force of innovation
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ir
Lieutenant colonel (سرهنگ دوم)
because cnn is zionist neocon aparatus.
shorter than the article but true.
Iran Khodro largest auto maker in larger middle east

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWwHIPoQdw8&list=UUMF4vfECnuAPAfW0s6lMpyg&index=1&feature=plcp

<a href="http://www.quickiqtest.net" title="IQ Test"><img src="http://www.quickiqtest.net/graphic/badges/sf114.gif" width="150" height="75" alt="IQ Test" border="0"></a><br>QuickIQTest.net - <a title="Quick IQ Test" href="http://www.quickiqtest.net">IQ Test</a>

this is the fixed video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn-T-5k0_4E&list=UUMF4vfECnuAPAfW0s6lMpyg&index=1

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moores law driving force of innovation
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ir
Lieutenant colonel (سرهنگ دوم)

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Colonel (سرهنگ)
funny compared to Syria do you see the people in bahrain hold up arms even when they are massacred? Because its a legit revolution!
Im Sunni by mind, Shia by Heart, and Muslim by soul! La Ellaha Ela Allah!

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Lieutenant colonel (سرهنگ دوم)
funny compared to Syria do you see the people in bahrain hold up arms even when they are massacred? Because its a legit revolution!

And no western msm coverage..

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ir
3rd lieutenant (ستوان سوم)
A policeman in Bahrain was killed and another critically injured in a bomb attack while on patrol south of the capital Manama, security officials said on Friday, as further unrest convulsed the Gulf Arab kingdom and close U.S. ally.

Bahrain, where the U.S. Fifth Fleet is based as a bulwark against Iran, has been volatile since majority Shi'ite Muslims began protesting against alleged discrimination last year.

Those protests were initially crushed by the kingdom's Sunni Muslim monarchy, with martial law and help from Gulf neighbors. However, smaller scale demonstrations have since resumed and anti-government protesters clash with security forces several times every week in the small island country.

The policemen were attacked in the village of Akr late on Thursday by rioters with petrol bombs and an unspecified "explosive device", the information authority said in a statement, citing Major General Tariq Hasan al-Hasan, the security chief.

One policeman died of his injuries on Friday morning while the other was in a critical condition, it said. An investigation was underway to find the assailants, Hasan said.

Earlier on Friday, Bahrain's interior ministry described the incident in the mostly Shi'ite village as a "terrorist attack".

Thousands of people attended the policeman's funeral in the mainly Sunni area of Rifaa on Friday afternoon, witnesses told Reuters.

Some mourners shouted "Down, down with Issa Qassim", in reference to Sheikh Issa Qassim, a spiritual guide to Shi'ites in Bahrain. Qassim is not connected to any party but led a pro-democracy protest of some 100,000 people in March.

Bahraini police have been the target of such bombings several times in the past year, most recently in May when four policemen were wounded.

Shi'ites complain of discrimination in the electoral system, jobs, housing and education and say they are mistreated by government departments, the police and the army. Government promises of action to address their concerns have come to nothing, they say.

An anti-government demonstration attended by thousands and organized by the main al Wefaq opposition bloc on Friday afternoon west of Manama passed off peacefully, witnesses said.

A commission of international legal experts reported in November that torture had been systematically used on protesters to punish them and extract hundreds of confessions. It recommended reviewing activists' jail sentences.

Bahraini authorities accuse regional Shi'ite power Iran of encouraging the unrest and have promised a tough response to violent protests as talks with the opposition have stalled.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/19/us-bahrain-bombing-idUSBRE89I0VZ20121019

Bahrain War has started.

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Officials call bomb blasts that killed 2 in Bahrain terrorism

Published November 05, 2012

Associated Press

    Mideast Bahrain_Leff.jpg

    Monday, Nov. 5, 2012 - Police collect evidence at the scene of an explosion that killed an Asian man in Manama, Bahrain. (AP)

MANAMA, Bahrain –  A series of bomb blasts in Bahrain's capital killed two people Monday, authorities said, a sign that some factions within the opposition may be increasingly turning to violence in the nearly 21-month uprising against the Gulf nation's Western-backed rulers.

The apparently coordinated string of five explosions in Manama -- described by officials as "terrorism" -- comes less than a week after Bahrain banned all protest gatherings in attempts to quell the deepening unrest in the strategic kingdom, which is home the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet.

Clashes have not eased, including crowds pelting three police stations with firebombs early Sunday. More than 55 people have been killed Bahrain's unrest since February 2011 as the nation's majority Shiites press for a greater political voice in the Sunni-ruled island nation.

Officials also suggested three could be crackdowns against Shiite religious leaders, and that could sharply intensify the clashes. Government spokeswoman Sameera Rajab blamed the attacks on statements by some Shiite "religious figures who haven't ceased inciting violence against civilians and police."

She said authorities would show "zero tolerance" in its efforts to stamp out unrest.

In Monday's violence, two Asian men were killed and a third person was injured as at least five homemade explosive devices were detonated, the Interior Ministry said. One man died after kicking a bomb and triggered an explosion, and the other died from injuries in a separate blast, officials said, but they did not immediately give names or nationalities.

Like all Gulf Arab countries, Bahrain has a large South Asian community of expatriate workers.

The official Bahrain News Agency described the blasts, over a nearly five-hour span, as an "act of terrorism."

Anti-government factions in Bahrain have used homemade bombs in the past, including a blast that killed a policeman last month in a mostly Shiite village. The latest attack suggests an expanding campaign of violence because of the scope of the bombings and their placement scattered throughout the heart of the capital, including near one area of restaurants and nightlife popular with Westerners.

On Wednesday, foreign ministers from the Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed) plan to meet in Bahrain to discuss regional issues, including Bahrain's tensions and growing clashes in Kuwait between security forces and an opposition led by Islamists.

Bahrain's Western allies have urged renewed efforts at dialogue to ease the crisis, but opposition groups insist that talks cannot move forward unless the monarchy is willing to make greater concessions to loosen its hold on the country's affairs. Bahrain's leaders have so far made reforms that include transferring more oversight powers to the elected parliament.

Shiites make up about 70 percent of Bahrain's 525,000 citizens. They claim they face systematic discrimination, such as being blocked from top political and security posts.

Last week, the U.S. State Department issued unusually harsh criticism against ally Bahrain after its decision to outlaw public demonstrations. Previously, officials in Bahrain had permitted some protest marches, but most clashes have occurred outside the authorized rallies.

"The decision to curb these rights is contrary to Bahrain's professed commitment to reform and will not help advance national reconciliation nor build trust among all parties," said State Department spokesman Mark Toner.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/11/05/officials-call-coordinated-bomb-blasts-that-killed-2-in-bahrain-terrorism/#ixzz2BNABZx4V

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اشداء على الكفار رحماء بينهم
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ir
Colonel (سرهنگ)
2 wildfire in Qatar, 2 explosion in Hijaz and 2 blast in know in Bahrain !
I said someone is killing nasty wahabis


http://www.iranmilitaryforum.net/think-tank/democracy-and-slaughter-in-burma-gold-rush-overrides-human-rights/new/#new

يا أيها المسلمون اتحدوا

حافظ‏ اگر قدم زنی در ره خاندان به صدق       ***         بدرقه رهت‏ شود همت‏ شحنه نجف        حافظ
بر  این زادم و هم بر این بگذرم          ***           یقین دان که خاک پی حیدرم        فردوسی
آن  کاشف  قرآن  که  خدا  در  همه  قرآن          ***           کردش صفت عصمت و بستود علی بود        مولوي
سعدی اگر عاشقی کنی و جوانی          ***           عشق محمد بس است و آل محمد        سعدی

خدا کشتی آنجا که خواهد برد  ***  وگر ناخدا جامه بر تن درد        سعدی
برد کشتی آن جا که خواهد خدای          ***           اگرجامه بر تن درد ناخدای        فردوسی

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Colonel (سرهنگ)
it feels like a resistance is stemming up! Insha Allah the people revolt against these wahabi and zionistic tools!

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ir
Colonel (سرهنگ)
it feels like a resistance is stemming up! Insha Allah the people revolt against these wahabi and zionistic tools!

saudi king need to dead really fast. the faster he die the faster SA gov will collapse, as we know there will be no stable gov after him because the conflicts of thousands power and bloodthirsty royal members.

Insha-Allah

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