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Master Sergeant (گروهبان)
please eagle tell me this has nothing to do with amerikkka as well!!!

please MO stop blaming every thing on america, america is a force of good in the world and a true guardian of democracy and human rights. how dare you say they had something to do with the condition the mideast is in now and has been in the last 60 some years.


lol sry just wanted to know what it feels like to be in denial for a little bit  ;)


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rouz
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Interesting blog post revealing the arrogant nature of the Khalifa family: http://thegrumpyowl.com/2011/02/18/bahrain-antoinette-let-them-eat-lol/

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please MO stop blaming every thing on america, america is a force of good in the world and a true guardian of democracy and human rights. how dare you say they had something to do with the condition the mideast is in now and has been in the last 60 some years.


lol sry just wanted to know what it feels like to be in denial for a little bit  ;)


damn I felt offended in the beginning bro lol! it must feel good to be in denial, lol I can imagine how it feels like to just debunk everything and anything honest into only a theory!
Im Sunni by mind, Shia by Heart, and Muslim by soul! La Ellaha Ela Allah!

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Colonel (سرهنگ)
Interesting blog post revealing the arrogant nature of the Khalifa family: http://thegrumpyowl.com/2011/02/18/bahrain-antoinette-let-them-eat-lol/
[/quote
man that really upset me! I couldnt finish reading what the bit$h had to say!shame on her! halal to cut her head off with a dirty blade this shaytan!

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S.M. Sergeant (استوار دوم)
Interesting blog post revealing the arrogant nature of the Khalifa family: http://thegrumpyowl.com/2011/02/18/bahrain-antoinette-let-them-eat-lol/


What a bunch of arrogant snubs. I hope they all live poor and in exsile for the rest of their natural lives. Also that poor guy (the picture) was shot from the back of the head. May the royal family pay for all those crimes.
There are times like these where the resolve of a Nation is shown clearly to the world. Oh this great Nation of Iran together with its proud citizens showed the world that when the Silent Majority gets rattled the world better pay attention:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ls4I37lQrw&feature=player_embedded#at=42  2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbYqckFvUJI&feature=player_embedded   2010

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This brings back sooooo much memory and tears to my eyes.
http://www.iranclip.com/player/169

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Master Sergeant (گروهبان)
'US needs Bahrain to fight Iran'


Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:11PM

A man stands on the US flag in support of popular uprising in Bahrain while rallying in Karachi in the southwest of Pakistan on February 20.
The US supports Bahrain's monarchy in the face of popular protests in order not to lose its foothold in the Persian Gulf to Iran, says a political expert.


The country is "is very strategically important for the United States interests in the [Persian] Gulf, facing the…Islamic Republic of Iran," Maher Salloum, international relations professor based in the Lebanese capital of Beirut, told Press TV on Sunday.

On Sunday, Bahrainis took to the streets for the eighth straight day to protest against the 12-year-long rule of King Hamad ibn Isa Al Khalifa. The protests have been motivated by the popular revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, which toppled the countries' heads of state.

So far, at least six people have been killed and hundreds more wounded during regime-ordered crackdown of the uprising. The Sunday demonstrations saw the protesters chanting, “The Army must protect the nation rather than attack it,” showed a report broadcast on our channel.

Most of the troops who opened fire on protesters are said to be foreign nationals granted Bahraini citizenship by the government.

The US, however, has refused to condemn the violence, only saying that it is monitoring the developments in Bahrain.

Bahrain is the headquarters of the US Navy's Fifth Fleet. Officials at Pentagon worry that the uprising might impinge on some 4,200 US service members who live and work there.

Referring to Washington's support for Manama, Salloum said, “What they fear is Iran. What they fear are the Shias, which are the most populous [part of the population] of Iran.”

“The problem is that they are not understanding [sic] our own belief, our own concepts, our own values that we cherish under the Islamic Republic of Iran or under, let's say, the Islamic resistance in Lebanon or any Islamic resistance in the world or the Arab world and the Islamic resistance of the world,” he said.

“Today, what we need is that our freedom of expression should be cherished and valued. We ought to have priorities in our lives. If we do not stand up by force, it seems there is no change. We need to change by democracy and our true values,” Salloum told Press TV.

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/166184.html

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"My Lord, grant me success in struggling during failure, in having patience in disappointment, in going alone, in Jihad without weapons, in working without pay, in making sacrifice in silence, in having religious belief in the world, in having ideology without popular traditions, in having faith without pretensions, non-conformity without immaturity, beauty without physical appearance, loneliness in the crowd, and loving without the beloved knowing about it. My Lord, You teach me how to live; I shall learn how to die."
- Ali Shariati

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SAUDI ARABIA AND THE CRISIS IN BAHRAIN

Posted on February 26th, 2011 under general with 1 reply.

Photo from Reuters

We are pleased to present this piece from our friend and colleague, Jean-François Seznec, whom we consistently find to be a uniquely insightful analyst of the intersection of politics, economics, and energy in the Middle East.  Jean-François is currently Visiting Associate Professor at Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, where his scholarship and teaching concentrate on the influence of political and social variables in the Gulf on financial and energy markets.  He has 25 years’ experience in international banking and finance, 10 of which were spent in the Middle East, and is currently Senior Advisor to PFC Energy as well as a founding member and Managing Partner of the Lafayette Group, LLC, a U.S.-based private investment company.  He holds a MIA from Columbia University and a MA and Ph.D. from Yale University.

by Jean-Francois Seznec, PhD

The momentous events in Bahrain are placing the Saudi government in a difficult position.  On the one hand, the Saudis fear the potential “fall” of Bahrain to Iran, on the other, they know that a muscled intervention and interference could actually create it.  Indeed, as the United States knows from experience, intervention and occupation do not win hearts and minds.

The most salient fact of Saudi policy at this time is that there is none.  The country suffers from a major power vacuum.  Any decision to invade and occupy Bahrain to put down a “Shi’ite” rebellion would have to come from the King himself after he has obtained consensus from the rest of the leadership of the country.   The King is 87 years old.  He has returned today from a three months absence in the US and Morocco due to illness and has not had the time and the energy to build a national consensus on a response to Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain or Libya.   Prince Sultan, the crown prince, who was handling the Kingdom in the King’s absence, is often reported to be unable to fulfill his role because of age and illness and could not build any kind of response or policy.  In any event, he could not have decided to intervene militarily or otherwise in Bahrain without the approval of the King himself or without full consensus from the leadership.  No other Prince could make such decision.  Not even the powerful Minister of Interior, Prince Nayef.

From five thousand miles away, the solution to the Bahrain crisis appears simple.  The al-Khalifas in Bahrain should accept the fact that their 230 years of feudal management of the island has to come to an end.  The King should accept to become a British-style monarch.  The Bahrainis should be allowed to have a true parliament and ultimately have a Prime Minister issued from a majority coalition of political forces in the island.  Indeed, the Bahrainis, especially the younger ones, feel Bahraini first, not Iranian, Saudi, Sunni or Shi’a.  A normal political contest would bring stability to the island, which would be good for the United States and for Saudi Arabia.

Unfortunately, this rosy scenario is under severe attack by an important side of the al-Khalifas who do not want to give up their right to control and plunder the island.  They know that their time is coming to a close and have their back to the wall.  They seek to create havoc and polarize the situation—i.e., make the uprising into a Sunni-Shi’i issue.  Their game is to ensure that the United States and the Saudis maintain their support of the corrupt regime as a bastion against “evil Iran”.  Undoubtedly the orders to shoot at the demonstrators came from this camp, to provoke and emphasize the sectarian split in the Island.  It is this  which has also given nationality to the foreign mercenaries in order to change the sectarian balance of the island, arrested and tortured Shi’a leaders, manipulated elections, seized the best pieces of land, demanded percentages in successful businesses, etc.  This faction of the family is headed by the Prime Minister.  For the past 35 years, the Prime Minister has been extremely clever in manipulating all the social groups.  He managed to divide sectarian and social groups to his advantage.  However, at this time, he is getting quite old and may not be able to limit the damage inflicted to the island by his rabidly anti-Shi’a entourage.  The Prime Minister and his group have substantial support among many Salafi Sunni groups, which view him as perhaps corrupt but strong enough to defend the true faith against the Shi’a.

The more liberal side of the family, headed by the Crown Prince, has shown that it is more willing to accommodate a new system of competition for power.  The Crown Prince does not seem to fear any Shi’a take over.  He seems to be only interested in having the island become a modern country ruled by law, not by whim, where every citizen has equal rights.  The Crown Prince has support among the more educated and liberal Sunnis and Shi’a.  Primarily, he has support among the youth, both Sunni and Shi’a.  The youth instigated the present demonstrations and have shown a great deal of disdain for the Shi’a-Sunni divide emphasized by the older generation.  Their motto is no Sunni, no Shi’i, just Bahraini.  The Crown Prince is also the commander in chief of the Army and, as such, has some influence against the more nefarious groups that his uncle commands, the secret police and the police forces, which are manned mainly by foreign mercenaries.

The struggle in Bahrain is between two visions of the Bahraini world.  On the one side, the feudal system, which divides Bahrain into religious sects, with one seeking to maintain and impose its domination of the other.  On the other side, a modern vision, which sees problems as social issues of economic disadvantages—have-nots versus the haves.  At times, the haves and haves-nots divide meets the sectarian divide—but not always and, in fact, less and less as the older generations lose their grip.

The King may be the arbiter between the feudal and the modern factions within his family, but over the years he has increasingly appeared to be a very weak figure unable to stand up to the faction headed by his uncle, the Prime Minister, which seeks to preserve its feudal control over society.

Both sides of the family, however, have one point in common—they view themselves as Bahrainis first, not Sunnis or Tribal.  In that sense, they also have something in common with the Bahraini demonstrators, even though they may not see it.  The feudal faction will claim that the opposition is Shi’a and therefore controlled by Iran.  The modern side will claim that the Salafis are under the thumb of the Saudis.  However, this gives an opening to the Crown Prince to bring the “Bahrainis” on both sides together, against the extremists, be they Shi’a, al-Khalifas, Salafis, etc.

If we try to put the Saudi equation and the Bahraini one together, it would appear that a Saudi direct intervention is not likely at this time.  The Saudi gerontocracy makes it difficult for the Saudi leadership to make any decision and any consensus will not be easy to achieve.  Many Saudis know well that any muscled intervention would backfire.  Even the most conservative elements in the Kingdom would shy away from being seen as invaders.  Physical Saudi presence in Bahrain would open the Kingdom to major criticism from all its neighbors and from most Muslim countries, thereby losing costing the Saudis the mantle of Islamic leadership which they have woven for generations.

On the other side of the Saudi causeway, even the most feudal among the al-Khalifas would be wary of a physical Saudi intervention, as it could lead to the rule of the al-Khalifas coming to an end.  The al-Khalifas would still nominally be left in charge by the al-Saud, but in practice they would have to give up their control and access to wealth to their neighbor.  From their point of view, it would be better to have the al-Saud in charge rather than the Iranians, but not much better.   Perhaps, some of the more feudal al-Khalifas do not see the danger of a foreign camel putting its nose into their tent.  After all, they did provide nationality to many Baluchi, Yemeni and Syrian military types, thereby creating a new class of Mamluks.  However, one can assume that the ultimate interest of the al-Khalifas is to remain in charge, and not sell out their inheritance to the al-Saud for a plate of lentil–like security.

Of course, Saudi intervention does not have to be just a military operation.  The Saudis could provide funds and intelligence support, which they probably do already.  They may provide support to the Salafi elements among Bahraini Sunnis in the form of money and organizational help.  The tribes that have dual Bahraini and Saudi citizenship will perhaps move more into Bahrain than they have before and provide muscled civilian support if need be.  They may try to undermine the Crown Prince’s efforts for a national dialogue, by creating incidents between the Salafis and the Shi’a.   These efforts could be very effective in maintaining havoc and instability.  However, many in the Saudi leadership must realize that havoc and instability may stop a Shi’a takeover, but would make the island much more susceptible to Iranian meddling.

Should there be a transition of power in Saudi Arabia to a younger successor, the Saudi leadership may see that the youth movement of Bahrain, Sunni and Shi’a, is actually strongly opposed to Iran.  A Bahrain led by the Crown Prince with a freely elected government representative of the various segments of society would in fact promote Bahraini stability and independence from both Iran and Saudi Arabia.  Ultimately, stability and a royal democracy is more favorable to Saudi interests than the present regime, which stands to create violent reactions and end up, unwittingly, doing Iran’s bidding.

http://www.raceforiran.com/

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Colonel (سرهنگ)
If/when Bahrain's ruling family fall, the US 5th fleet will also have to go which also means the house of Saud will eventually collapse...Hence, the US will try and do all they can to prevent Bahrain from falling.It's a whole house of cards type of empire - Just not sustainable..Just my two cents..
Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 07:02:42 AM by reza18

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'Saudi Arabia sends tanks to Bahrain'
Mon Feb 28, 2011 10:42PM


Saudi Arabia is sending some 30 tanks to Bahrain which were sighted late Monday along the King Fahd causeway linking the two countries, witnesses say.


Pro-democracy protests in Bahrain have shown no sign of decline after almost two weeks. The protesters are demanding the resignation of the government, constitutional reforms and the king's abdication.

Witnesses said that the causeway was blocked as "15 tank carriers carrying two tanks each were heading towards Bahrain," Egypt's al-Masry al-Youm daily reported in its latest edition.

Given the popular protests in the Persian Gulf kingdom, the transfer of the military hardware from Saudi Arabia to Bahrain seems highly unusual, commuters traveling along the 25-km causeway said.

The development follows a decision by the Bahraini military on Saturday to withdraw their vehicles out of the capital's Pearl Square after a deadly police attack on protesters, a condition the opposition had set to begin talks.

The arrival of tanks from Saudi Arabia also occurs on the eve of yet another scheduled pro-democracy rally on Tuesday organized by the Bahraini opposition and protesters in Manama's flashpoint Pearl Square.

Massive protests in Bahrain, which hosts the US Navy's Fifth Fleet in the region, have shown no sign of a decline after almost two weeks.

The protesters are demanding the resignation of the government, constitutional reforms and the king's abdication.

Fears of Saudi intervention in the ongoing Bahraini uprising first came to the fore last week when unconfirmed reports emerged on Wednesday.

Saudi officials had reportedly told US authorities that they were "prepared to intervene" should such a move prove necessary to protect Bahrain's embattled government.

FTP/MRS/MGH


http://www.presstv.ir/detail/167565.html

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Bahraini Shia Opposition Leader: If Saudi Military Intervene in Bahrain Affairs, We Ask Help from Iran

Bahraini protesters in response to the news that if Saudi military intervene in the internal affairs of Bahrain for the suppression of popular protests, announced that they probably will seek help from Iran to respond to any intervention.

Bahraini protesters in response to the news that if Saudi military intervene in the internal affairs of Bahrain for the suppression of popular protests, announced that they probably will seek help from Iran to respond to any intervention.
The Shiiite leader of Haq Movement (Right Mov.), the main opposition movement in Bahrain, Hassan Mushaima,  who returned in Manama after years in exile said: "If Saudi military interfere in the internal affairs of Bahrain, in this case Iranian army has right to interfere Bahrain affairs to support protesters.
"If Bahrain's ruling system resorting help from Saudi Arabia, in this case it is the right of opposition groups to appeal for help from Iran" Mushaima said in an interview with Alakhbar newspaper.
Mshym Affairs said even spiritual intervention also involved in the affairs of a country is a country, let alone military intervention that has its place. He often through military intervention Persian Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed) are carried out.

http://www.abna.ir/data.asp?lang=3&id=228913

oooohhhhhh this is getting interesting.

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oooohhhhhh this is getting interesting.


And i hope Iran responds!

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Colonel (سرهنگ)
I doubt the Saudis will intervene..it's all for show..They have enough problems at home.The sad part is, all their oil regions are under Shia majority areas. Any intervention will be very messy...Very messy!!!

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Bahrain roaring with overdue revolution
Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:32AM
By Kian Mokhtari


British Colonel Ian Henderson, working as an advisor to Bahrain's king Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa.


"Many Bahrainis blame British national Ian Henderson for the recent violent crackdown on thousands of pro-democracy protesters" and not without good reason.


From Africa to the Middle East, over the last fifty years, wherever Britain's Colonel Ian Henderson has lent a hand to oppressive regimes, reports have emerged of physical, psychological and sexual abuse of political detainees.

Mr. Henderson's line of work is to suffocate the cries for justice. Mind you he is certainly not the first, nor will he be the last for as long as humanity takes pleasure in inflicting pain on its own. Ian Henderson's connection with Bahrain goes way back a long way.

He served as the head of Bahrain's state security for thirty years until 1998. During his time in the post, he got fabulously rich through introduction of torture techniques to take the edge off the dissenting Bahraini voices. Dozens of reports have been made about his ill treatment of political prisoners to the UN, but to date, none have been acted on by the world body -probably because there's no money in it.

Ian Henderson physically took part and pleasure in the gruesome proceedings of his deviant practices as many older Bahraini Shia citizens would certify.

In his advanced years now, the aging sadist is grimly hanging on as advisor to his raggedy-headed majesty, king Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa.

And wouldn't you know it the all out assault on Bahraini Capital Manama's Pearl Square by the Bahraini army had in fact been planned by Mr. Henderson. The crackdown left seven dead and hundreds of others wounded. People where even shot at with large caliber machine guns as they made their way to the hospital to find their friends and loved ones.

The raggedy king, whose name and title is longer than Bahrain's coastline, praised his murderous mercenaries for killing his dissenting subjects after the military assault on Pearl Square.

But the demonstrators have seen it all before, especially during the 1980s when the Shia population was mercilessly "put into its place" by Isa al-Khalifa's torturers. The Bahraini people now want king Isa bin whatever, to end his cruel imposition on the Persian Gulf Island. The freeloading, out of touch and glove puppet raggedy doll monarch must vacate his many palaces and take off.

Meanwhile a good cop, bad cop routine -probably also devised by Mr. Henderson- has come into play. The Bahraini Crown Prince Sheikh Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa -al-whatever feels good- "graciously" stepped in and ordered the army to leave Pearl Square.

This is absurd.

So where was the supposedly reform-minded prince all these years? Womanizing abroad or at home like many other raggedy-phony princes from propped up raggedy monarchies in that part of the world?

In any case, the Crown Prince Sheikh Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa is said to have ordered the military to withdraw from the streets.

However shortly afterwards, protesters stormed the square and took it back. The police fired round after round of teargas and rubber bullets. In fact so much was fired at the protesters that the police ran out of ammunition. And then the "police surrendered."

At this moment his raggedy majesty, king Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa is attempting to hold national dialogue with a nation he has never legitimately ruled over.

This in utter desperation is to hang on to his sorry throne.

The streets of Bahrain's capital, Manama are roaring with the sounds of a very long overdue revolution. Massacres of the innocent, torture by hired mercenary deviants like Henderson or heavy police and army crackdowns will no longer suffice. The king is a lost cause and princes from his "right royal household" also must lend an ear to the people's calls for justice.

The people of Bahrain would be well advised to make the necessary arrangements for a government of the people, by the people, for the people. Raggedy, glove-puppet, Western oriented Sheikhdoms are an embarrassment.

KM/PKH


http://www.presstv.ir/detail/167318.html

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Human rights in Bahrain in grave stage
Tue Mar 8, 2011 12:48PM
Kourosh Ziabari



A female anti-government protester holds a banner during a protest at the Bahrain Financial Habour in Manama, March 7, 2011.


It's categorically demonstrable by facts and figures that Bahrain has one of the blackest human rights records among the Arab countries surrounding the Persian Gulf.


Bahrain has a population of less than 800,000, 70 percent of them practicing Shias; however, this tiny Arab country is renowned for its longstanding tradition of suppressing the Shia majority, exercising inhumane methods of torturing, imprisoning the political activists, putting restrictions on the mass media and exploiting foreign workers for various purposes.

When Hamad Bin Isa Al Khalifa assumed the throne as the king of Bahrain in 2001, the situation of human rights in this country was quite deplorable and alarming. According to a report by the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, several people were incarcerated during anti-government demonstrations or public gatherings and sent to prisons for lengthy periods of time, tortured by loathsome methods such as sleep deprivation or sexual assault. “On 17 December, 2007 on Martyrs' Day aimed at paying tribute to past victims of torture, members of the Special Security Forces began a wave of arrests targeting more than 60 individuals, among them over 10 activists. Within the month of February 2009, several key human rights defenders in Bahrain were arbitrarily arrested and detained including Abbas Abdul Aziz Al-Umran, Sayed Sharaf Ahmed, Ali Hassan Salman, and Jaafar Kadhim Ebrahim," the report says.

In a flagrant and indefensible movement, King Hamad issued Bahrain's Royal Decree 56 in 2002 which entrusted legal and judicial impunity to the government officials, state police forces and all of those who were involved in the cases of human rights abuse in Bahrain. The UN Committee against Torture condemned this decision; however, the Bahraini monarch was quite satisfied with the result of his "royal decision" and even paved the ground for the promotion of a number of those officials and state police forces who had committed human rights abuses during the 1990s.

The UN Committee against Torture explicitly asked the Bahraini government to dissolve the royal Decree 56 and allow the federal courts to investigate the possible crimes against humanity which the Bahraini police officers and other security forces had perpetrated, but the government of King Hamad refused to heed the international calls and impeded the prosecution of wrongdoers who had mercilessly tortured political dissidents and human rights activists in the jails of Manama.

According to the statistics released by the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, there are currently 514 political prisoners in Bahrain, 116 of them are children. Some of the Bahraini political activists who were imprisoned for speaking out against the injustice administered by the government retold heartrending accounts of the torture and persecution they were subject to while in the underground prisons of Bahraini monarchy.

"Since my arrest when I was taken to an underground prison, I have been severely tortured. They used electric shocks, my eyes were blindfolded and my hands tied behind my back. I was not allowed to sleep for the first 5-6 days," said one of the prisoners upon his release, asking to remain anonymous.

"Due to the severity of the beatings on my head and ears, both my ear drums have torn. Some nights I bled due to the severity of the beatings as well as the electric shocks," said another prisoner in an article posted on the website of Bahrain Center for Human Rights.

But the persecution of political dissidents and activists in Bahrain has been so all-encompassing and broad that even the international organizations in the countries with which Bahrain has developed close diplomatic ties couldn't remain silent in the face of the grave violation of human rights in this Persian Gulf country.

Dr. Abdul Jalil Al-Singace, the Chairman of the Human Rights Committee of the Haq Movement was arrested on August 13, 2010, only one day after King Hamad demagogically appealed to the critics of the government and opposition leaders in exile to return to their country and enjoy freedom of expression and action.

Dr. Abdul Jalil and his family members were arrested on the morning of August 13 in the Manama Airport, simply one day after the King of Bahrain promised increased freedoms for the government critics and opposition leaders.

Several other political activists were also arrested following the imprisonment of Dr. Abdul Jalil, who was residing in London and had attended a session of the House of Lords on August 5 and briefed the Parliament Members about the situation of human rights in Bahrain.

According to a report by the UK-based Islamic Human Rights Commission, Abdul Ghani Al-Khanjar, the spokesman of the Committee of Martyrs and Victims of Torture, Sheikh Saeed Al-Nouri and Sheikh Mohammad Habib Al-Miqdad, who have campaigned against political repression in the country, were arrested in early morning raids on their homes on August 16.

Three weeks after the widespread imprisonments which encompassed the whole Bahrain such a striking thunderstorm, the Human Rights Watch called on the Bahraini government to release the arrested opposition leaders and make sure about their physical and mental health; however, reports leaked out from the prisons in which they were kept incommunicado showed that the government of Bahrain had treated Dr. Abdul Jalil and his fellow activists in the most aggressive and cruel way.

Upon his release from the prison, Dr. Abdul Jalil told the Bahrain's Attorney General that he was handcuffed and blindfolded the entire time he spent in jail. He said that his captors beat him on his fingers with a hard instrument, slapped him around, and pulled and twisted his nipples and ears with tongs.

Interestingly, Bahrain is a member state to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. According to the Article 9 of this convention, "anyone who is arrested shall be informed, at the time of arrest, of the reasons for his arrest and shall be promptly informed of any charges against him," and "shall be brought promptly before a judge or other officer authorized by law to exercise judicial power." However, Bahrain has never clung to this rules and abused the human rights in the most brutal ways.

Bahrain Youth Society For Human Rights is an active organization which reports the cases of human rights violations in this Arab country. According to reports published by this organization, the three opposition groups of Bahrain Freedom Movement, the Haq Movement and the Al-Wafa Islamic Movement are constantly harassed by the government and many of their members are imprisoned without any trial and tortured without any warrant, justification or explication.

The website of Bahrain Youth Society For Human Rights has published tear-jerking pictures and photos of the Bahrainis who were subject to the brutal torturing of the country's police and security forces. These pictures depict the severe physical damages which are inflicted on the Bahraini youths who were imprisoned during the demonstrations and public gatherings and the political activists who were jailed while they were in their homes.

Overall, Bahrain in which an all-out revolution against the 40-year uncontested monarchy is looming doesn't have a healthy and pure human rights record. What people in this Arab country want is freedom, improved living conditions and an end to the discriminatory treatment with the Shias. Will the Bahraini dictators finally heed the calls of their people?

KZ/AKM


http://www.presstv.ir/detail/168845.html

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Jews prepare to migrate in mass to Romania in next years, according to last rumors, saying a war is going to start in Middle East. I wonder as Romanian, what reaction we Romanian will have at that moment, when millions of Jews will settle in Romania in order to save from death... in case of a war. Already 500.000 Jews from Israel have Romanian ID cards and the authorities consider them as Romanian citizens.

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Jews prepare to migrate in mass to Romania in next years, according to last rumors, saying a war is going to start in Middle East. I wonder as Romanian, what reaction we Romanian will have at that moment, when millions of Jews will settle in Romania in order to save from death... in case of a war. Already 500.000 Jews from Israel have Romanian ID cards and the authorities consider them as Romanian citizens.
how accurate is this info?

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Bahrain activists threatened with 'death'

As mass anti-government protests continue in Bahrain, prominent human rights activists in the kingdom say they have received death threats through Facebook from anonymous groups.

Rupert Colville of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said on Friday that messages published on Facebook and other social networks threatened to kill Mohammed al-Maskati and Naji Fateel of the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights, as well as Abdulhadi al-Khawaja of Human Rights Defenders, all of whom they branded as 'traitors,' a Press TV correspondent reported.

According to Colville, the death threats provide detailed information about how to track the activists and showed their photos, addresses, telephone numbers, personal identification card numbers and the model of their cars.

He also voiced UN's grave concern about the activists' security and urged the Bahraini officials to protect them.

The civil activists accuse the government of being behind the threats. A government spokesman, however, denied the allegation.

On Friday, Bahraini police opened fire on anti-government protesters heading toward the Royal Court in the capital city of Manama, injuring over 770 persons. Of those, 107 sustained injuries serious enough to require hospitalization.

The violence occurred as protesters marched on the Royal Court en masse amid tight security in the town of Riffa, a residential area where the ruling Al Khalifah family live, the Bahraini Health Ministry said.

Roughly 8,000 people marched toward the Royal Court to force the kingdom to respond to the people's demands.

Thousands of women joined the protesters to demand an end to King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifah's rule.

They also called for the ouster of the government and said they want a new constitution.

But they were suddenly faced by hundreds of pro-government forces -- security and civilian -- carrying swords, hatchets, metal pieces, cricket instruments, and pieces of wood with nails hammered into them.

Earlier, the government described the rally as a security threat. Manama also warned organizers and participants that they would be held responsible for any unrest in the country.

Government officials have denied the reports that the security forces used live ammunition and that people inhaled tear gas to the point of suffocation.

Riffa is just over 12 miles (20 kilometers) southwest of the capital, Manama, where anti-government demonstrators have been protesting in Pearl Square since February 14.

http://presstv.com/detail/169472.html

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Bahrain, Oman to get $20bn amid unrest

Foreign ministers of the Persian Gulf littoral states pledge USD 20 billion in financial aid to Bahrain and Oman, warning against foreign meddling at a time when both countries are struggling with popular uprisings.

Growing protests in Bahrain and Oman have rattled the other members of the six-nation [Persian] Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed), raising concerns that Middle East uprisings would affect OPEC members, reported Morning Star Online.

The council pledged the USD 20 billion in aid over 10 years to be split between the two nations, said the United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan.

The foreign ministers meeting in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, also issued a statement warning that they would not allow foreign interference in their affairs.

Bahrain and Oman have tried to allay discontent in their countries through a variety of economic measures, but neither country has the economic firepower or oil wealth of the other members of the council such as Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Qatar and Kuwait.

The combined economies of Bahrain and Oman are less than one-fifth of that of Saudi Arabia and the aid package would be a major boost for their budgets.

The money will be enough to allow Oman and Bahrain to press ahead more aggressively with long-needed social initiatives.

http://presstv.com/detail/169600.html

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Bahraini protesters surround palace

Tens of thousands of people in Bahrain have surrounded the Safriyah Palace to demand an end to the monarchy.

Nurses and doctors are standing by for any possible violence. This is the latest in a wave of anti-government protests against the rule of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, The Associated Press reported.

The protest on Saturday comes a day after police -- with the help of pro-government vigilantes -- used teargas against mostly Shia, anti-government protesters. Over 700 people were injured as they marched towards the Royal Court in the capital Manama.

Meanwhile, US Defense Secretary Robert Gates visited the capital after attending a NATO defense ministers meeting in Brussels. Gates met with King Hamad and Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa on Saturday to reassure the monarchy of the United States' full support.

"I told both the king and the crown prince that across the region I did not believe there could be a return to the status quo," Gates said. "Obviously, leading reform and being responsive is the way we would like to see this unfold," he added.

The visit comes two weeks after the highest-ranking officer in the US military, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen, stopped in Manama, which is home to the US Navy's Fifth Fleet.

Bahrainis have been staging protests since mid-February, demanding the resignation of King Hamad and constitutional reforms to the Sunni-led government. They also want free and fair elections as well as the release of political prisoners.

http://presstv.com/detail/169571.html

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OMG check this out


Watch this NEW VID---> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3CTpRJ_d9Y


 "We have clearly declared that the nuclear bomb belongs to politically retarded governments who lack logic," Ahmadinejad

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The Saudi National Guards are about to enter Bahrain according to the British Government:

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/middle-east-north-africa/bahrain

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OMG check this out


Face To Face Shoting in bahrain- alwefaqtube

the bastards shot him 3 times!!!! WTF!!! once in the leg, once in the stomach and once in the face!!!

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Saudi soldiers sent into Bahrain!!



Hundreds of Saudi troops have entered Bahrain to help protect government facilities there amid escalating protests against the government.

Bahrain television on Monday broadcast images of troops in armoured cars entering the Gulf state via the 26km causeway that connects the kingdom to Saudi Arabia.

The arrival of the troops follows a request to members of the Gulf Co-Operation Council (PGCC (An incomplete acronym was completed: PGCC)) from Bahrain, whose Sunni rulers have faced weeks of protests and growing pressure from a majority Shia population to institute political reforms.

The United Arab Emirates has also sent about 500 police to Bahrain, according to Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan, the Emirati foreign minister.

The United States, which counts both Bahrain and Saudi Arabia among its allies, has called for restraint, but has refrained from saying whether it supports the move to deploy troops.

"We urge our PGCC (An incomplete acronym was completed: PGCC) (Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed)) partners to show restraint and respect the rights of the people of Bahrain, and to act in a way that supports dialogue instead of undermining it," Tommy Vietor, the White House spokesman, said.

'Solidarity move'

Abdel al-Mowada, the deputy chairman of Bahrain's parliament, told Al Jazeera that it was not clear how the Saudi force would be deployed but denied the troops would become a provocation to protesters.

"It is not a lack of security forces in Bahrain, it is a showing of solidarity among the PGCC (An incomplete acronym was completed: PGCC)," he told Al Jazeera.

"I don't know if they are going to be in the streets or save certain areas ... [but protesters] blocking the roads are no good for anyone, we should talk.

"The government is willing to get together and make the changes needed, but when the situation is like this, you cannot talk."

The troops arrived less than 24 hours after Bahraini police clashed with demonstrators in one of the most violent confrontations since troops killed seven protesters last month.

But opposition groups, including Wefaq, the country's largest Shia movement, have spoken out against the use of foreign troops.

"We consider the entry of any soldier or military machinery into the Kingdom of Bahrain's air, sea or land territories a blatant occupation," Wefaq said in a statement.

'Blatant occupation'

Nabeel Rajab, from the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, told Al Jazeera that the Saudi troops would be opposed by the protesters.

"This is an internal issue and we will consider it as an occupation," he said. "This step is not welcomed by Bahrainis. This move is not acceptable at all. It is a repressive regime supported by another repressive regime."


Already, as reports circulated about the Saudi force's arrival, hundreds of protesters had gathered behind makeshift checkpoints around the Pearl Roundabout, the scene of much of the protest in Bahrain.

Even some government supporters fear the economic impact of a Saudi intervention.

"Who would want to do business here if there are Saudi tanks rolling across the causeway?" asked Abdullah Salaheddin, a Bahraini banker, last week.

In a sign that the opposition and Bahrain's royal family could still find a solution, the opposition groups said they had met Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa, Bahrain's crown prince, to discuss the mechanism for national dialogue.

The crown prince offered assurances on Sunday that dialogue would address key opposition demands including giving parliament more power and reforming government and electoral districts.


http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/03/2011314124928850647.html

UAE joins Saudi invasion of Bahrain



The United Arab Emirates has sent around 500 police forces to neighboring Bahrain following an invasion led by Saudi Arabia to crack down on Bahraini protesters.


“The Bahrain government asked us yesterday to look at ways to help them to defuse tension in Bahrain,” Emirati Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan said on Monday.


“We have already sent roughly around 500 of our police force who are there,” he said at a gathering of Group of Eight foreign ministers in Paris.

The deployment came after UAE decided to join the Persian Gulf contingent sent to Bahrain to help the tiny kingdom in its deadly crackdown on protesters.

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said that the UAE decision to join the contingent reflects the determination of member states of the (Persian) Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed) to “close ranks in face of any danger.”

In addition to Bahrain and the UAE, the council includes Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Saudi Arabia earlier said that it also answered Bahrain's request for support, shortly before Bahrain's state television aired footage of troops from the council's joint Peninsula Shield Force crossing King Fahd causeway from Saudi Arabia.

Bahrain's opposition, however, said it considered any foreign military intervention to be an “occupation” and called on the international community to act to ensure the “protection of the people of Bahrain from the danger of foreign military intervention.”

Opposition protesters are demanding far-reaching democratic reform in the country which has been ruled by al-Khalifa dynasty for more than 200 years.

The king has offered dialogue and a new, empowered parliament and other reforms but the opposition has refused to sit down to talks until the government resigns.

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/169946.html

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Quote
March 15, 2011
‘Saudi intervention is a declaration of war’
By staff and agencies


MANAMA/TEHRAN - Bahraini opposition groups, including the largest Shia Muslim party Wefaq, said on Monday that any intervention by foreign Arab forces on the Persian Gulf island is a declaration of war and occupation.

The comments came in response to reports that Bahrain had called in forces from its Persian Gulf neighbors to put down the month-long uprising, Reuters reported.

More than 1,000 Saudi troops, part of the Persian Gulf countries’ Peninsula Shield Force, have entered Bahrain, a Saudi official told AFP on Monday.

The Saudi forces are there on behalf of the Persian Persian Gulf Cooperation Council (An incomplete reference was completed) (PGCC), the regional organization whose members are Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman.

Their intervention underlines Saudi Arabia’s deep concern over the unrest on its border, but it will most likely only harden the stance of the protesters, who have not been satisfied with the government’s response to their demands, The Christian Science Monitor reported.

Opposition protesters are demanding far-reaching democratic reform in the mainly Shia country which has been ruled by a Sunni monarchy for more than 200 years.

King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa has offered dialogue and a new, empowered parliament and other reforms, but the opposition has refused to sit down to talks until the government resigns.

-------Iran expresses concern

Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman also expressed deep concern over the intensification of violence and foreign intervention in Bahrain.

Commenting on U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ recent visit to Manama, Ramin Mehmanparast said that it would be better for the United States to respect democracy and regional nations’ rights instead of giving the green light to military intervention in Bahrain.

The Saudi intervention came after Gates visited Manama last week and held talks with King Hamad, in which he allegedly urged him to make rapid and significant reforms.

But apart from rhetorical condemnation, the U.S. has yet to take any action against the Bahraini government.

Bahrain received roughly $19 million in military aid from the U.S. in 2010, and expects to receive a similar amount this year.

Many Bahrainis are now nervously looking across to Saudi Arabia and wondering whether its neighbor will send more troops to prop up its close ally, the Al Khalifa ruler.

According to Al Jazeera, anti-regime protesters are concerned that Saudi troops will be used to clear Pearl Square. And even some regime supporters fear the economic impact of what would essentially become a foreign invasion.

Political analysts believe that if foreign troops confront protesters, the situation will most likely escalate.

------- Calls for martial law

Also on Monday, a parliamentary group asked King Hamad to impose martial law in Bahrain.

The parliamentary bloc’s statement, carried by the state-run Bahrain News Agency, asked for a three-month declaration of martial law and claimed “extremist movements” are trying to disrupt the country and push it toward sectarian conflict, Al Jazeera reported.

The appeal also seeks a curfew and the dispatch of army units across the country.

But witnesses say there are now checkpoints -- manned by ordinary citizens -- in several cities and towns outside Manama.

The thousands of protesters camped in Pearl Square say they will not leave until the king steps down and the government implements political and economic reforms.

-------Ministry of Foreign Affairs closed

In another development, Bahraini protesters closed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and ordered the employees to leave on Monday.

According to the Ahlul Bayt News Agency, security forces created checkpoints on the King Fahd Causeway on Monday and only allowed vehicles to enter Saudi Arabia after inspecting them.


http://www.tehrantimes.com/index_View.asp?code=237476

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