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Egypt's electoral commission dismisses disqualified candidates’ appeals

Egypt’s electoral commission has turned down appeals filed by all ten candidates disqualified from running in the May presidential election.


"All appeals have been rejected because nothing new was offered in the appeal requests," a member of the commission, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told Reuters on Tuesday.

On Saturday, 10 of the 23 registered candidates for the upcoming presidential election were barred from running.

Salafist Hazem Abu Ismail, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Khairat al-Shater, and former intelligence chief Omar Suleiman were among those disqualified.

Representatives of the three candidates filed appeals before the deadline on Monday. A final list of candidates will be released on April 26.

The electoral commission says its decision to disqualify these candidates was based on legal grounds.

Egyptians had been outraged by Suleiman’s decision to register as a candidate in the country’s first freely contested presidential election.

Suleiman is notorious for his role in the brutal repression of opposition groups during the rule of long-time dictator Hosni Mubarak, who was toppled in February 2011 in a popular revolution.

Egypt's presidential election is scheduled to be held over two days on May 23 and 24, while a run-off will be held from June 16 to 17, if necessary.
Tavanaa Bovad Har Ke Danaa Bovad - Ferdowsi
If I sit silently I have sinned - Mossadegh

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Egypt: Violence after rejection of Abu Ismail’s candidature

Clashes erupted near the electoral commission here following rejection of the presidential candidature of Salafist politician Hazim Abu Ismail, officials said.

Supporters of Ismail clashed last evening with Central Security Forces tasked with guarding the headquarters of the Presidential Election Commission in Heliopolis, they said.

The Commission confirmed that 10 candidates have been barred from running for president owing to irregularities in their applications, including Ismail.

The officials said his supporters raised shoes at the forces after the decision to disqualify Ismail, who later called for an open-ended sit-in protest in front of the Commission against his exclusion from the race.

“I feel that what happening is conspiracy and treason,” Mr. Ismail said.

Ismail’s supporters said hundreds of them were on their way to join the sit-in, State-run Middle East News Agency reported.

The radical leader had accused the Commission of using forged documents to prove that his mother, Nawal Abdel Aziz Nour, held US citizenship, which became the reason for his exclusion.

According to the Constitutional Declaration of March 2011, presidential candidates must be Egyptians born to Egyptian parents.

Ismail and his supporters accuse Western countries and Egypt’s ruling generals of trying to keep him out of contention from next month’s ballot.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/article3326922.ece

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This election is a sham, they pressured ElBaradai to withdraw, they banned the candidates of the two largest parties al-Nour and Muslim Brotherhood and Sulaiman, the favorite of Mubarak supporters. Americans have been trying to set up Amr Moussa for Presidency from the moment they saw Mubarak would fall and now there is literally no-one left in the race to challenge him.

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Abu Ismail was in favor of revoking Egypt's peace treaty with Israel. I think this is the main reason he was banned.

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Was Al-Shater in favor of revoking the peace treaty to?

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I hate to say I told you so!

http://demagocracy.livejournal.com/1004.html
Quote
Don't let them pull a FIS on you... and don't think for a second the Arab kleptocrat billions "frozen" in US and European banks, won't be used as "collateral" to guarantee that future governments will be as "Israel-friendly" as the Mubarak regime has been!

"FIS": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algerian_National_Assembly_elections,_1991

Besides, they are running out of money. Even the IMF says they can't bail out Egypt anymore, so eventually they have to go beg from the PGCC.
http://demagocracy.livejournal.com
http://asymmetronix.livejournal.com

"Bunker"Bill, aka the "Member Formerly Known as Parthenon" (MFKAP)

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Was Al-Shater in favor of revoking the peace treaty to?

El-Shater is more of an Erdogan, he is not in favor if breaking and damaging any relations with Israel or changing Egypt's geo-strategic allegiances and international positions at all, but he has some tough words for Israel and may consider to take some symbolic actions to show that he is less pro-Israeli than Mubarak. In fact, the Muslim Brotherhood as a whole has decided to go in that direction and they have abandoned most of the principles bit by bit since Mubarak fell.

The problem is, that Israel and their supporters act so outraged at any tiny criticism against them, that if any politician or public figure ever in his life says he may not fully agree with Israel on just this one policy, they completely freak out and launch a multi-million dollar media campaign against him to make him look like the worst wahabi extremist on earth (even if he isn't even a Muslim) or a fascist and Israel hater. And then most sheep, which don't look into the facts, believe this. In case of Western leaders, they backpedal immedietly (like when Obama said he doesn't agree with Netanyahu's expansion of settlements and all Israel's stooges in the media and politics were "outraged" and went to large extents to condemn him as a man betraying America's allies and a Jew-hater, until he was forced to apologize, even though he planned to continue funding Israel's expansion of settlements but was just saying he personally didn't think it was a good idea) and in case of Middle Eastern leaders, like Erdogan, like al-Shater and this Mursy guy which is replacing him (and also Fotouh) this is great for the reputation and they don't need to suffer any consequences (in terms of Israel/US/West attacking them or sanctioning them - just compare US/Israel/EU policy towards Saddam, Assad or Iran, to their policy towards Turkey and Jordan, who's prime ministers are soo "critical" of Israel)

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Mubarak's PM is back in Egypt election race

The last prime minister of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak has squeezed back into Egypt's presidential race after an 11th-hour reprieve by the state election committee, the latest twist in a turbulent build-up to next month's vote.

Ahmed Shafiq's reinstatement comes just two days after he was excluded under a law passed by the Islamist-led parliament stripping political rights from top Mubarak-era figures.

Shafiq appealed and the committee reversed itself late on Wednesday, drawing a rebuke from the Muslim Brotherhood which dominates parliament and championed the law. The committee was to announce the final candidate list later on Thursday.

Chronic confusion over who can run for president underlines the fragility of a democratic transition in the Arab world's most populous country and raises questions over the military's willingness to give up power after the formal handover in July.

The change of mind came so late on Wednesday that Shafiq was not on a list of 12 approved candidates that appeared in state newspapers on Thursday, compounding uncertainty in a race punctuated by high-profile disqualifications.

"The committee has accepted his appeal and will add his name to the list based on its decison yesterday (Wednesday)," Shafiq's lawyer, Shawqi Sayyid, told Reuters.

Egypt's state news agency said on Wednesday Shafiq was back in the race, citing an election committee official.

Shafiq is a strong contender because of his links to the ruling generals and could appeal to some Egyptians who see a man with military experience as their best hope for an end to the political turmoil since Mubarak's overthrow

ANGERING ISLAMISTS

His re-entry could split the anti-Islamist vote, making it a tougher race for Amr Moussa, a liberal who was head of the Arab League, as well as a former foreign minister under Mubarak. Ministers were not among those targeted under the new law.

It will also anger Islamists and pro-democracy groups who fear Shafiq's candidacy is a ploy by old regime figures who want to restore the tightly-controlled politics of the Mubarak era.

Islamists and other groups have called for a demonstration on Friday called "Saving the Revolution", which is expected to focus anger at the army and those like Shafiq viewed as trying revive the political fortunes of Mubarak's allies.

The electoral committee decided to refer the law that was used to disqualify Shafiq to the Supreme Constitutional Court to review its constitutionality.

Mahmoud Ghozlan, a spokesman for the Muslim Brotherhood, said the committee must simply apply the law and its decision to bring back Shafiq had dealt a blow to its credibility.

"Its behaviour is clearly characterised by confusion: today no, tomorrow, yes, and the truth is this shakes its status and its position as a neutral committee," Ghozlan told Reuters. "It has a law and it is obliged to apply it and it is not its business to examine whether or not it is constitutional."

The vote is set for May 23 and 24, with a run-off scheduled in June for the top two candidates. No one is expected to win more than 50 percent of the votes to win in the first round.

Some opinion polls have put Moussa in the lead, although that was in late March. Several candidates have emerged since then and some have been disqualified, including Mubarak's former spy chief, as well as the first-choice Brotherhood candidate.

Other front-runners include the Brotherhood's Mohamed Mursi, who had been held in reserve, and Abdel Moneim Abol Fotouh, an ex-Brotherhood member who is trying to project a broader appeal.

Shafiq said in February he would run for president because he had the experience to maintain good ties with the generals and ensure a smooth handover to civilian rule.

The 71-year-old, an ex-air force commander who was civil aviation minister for a decade, said he can bridge the divisions in Egypt. The country has been led by army officers since the overthrow of King Farouk in 1952.

A popular Salafi sheikh was also barred last week from the vote and remaining Islamist contenders, including the Brotherhood's Mursi, are wooing his supporters.

The voting intentions of Salafis, ultra-conservative Muslims whose main party came second behind the Brotherhood's party in the parliamentary vote, appeared divided. Their votes could prove crucial in determining if an Islamist wins and who it is.

An influential religious body whose decisions are respected by many Salafis and other Islamists said on Wednesday that it was backing Mursi.

"The Religious Authority for Rights and Reform announces its full support for Mohamed Mursi and appeals to all national and Islamic forces to announce their support for him as well to unite the word, strengthen the revolution's march and to achieve the renaissance project," it said.

But the main Salafi al-Nour party has said it may back a moderate Islamist candidate.

"I consider this announcement of its decision in this timing and in this way is a departure from the consensus initiative adopted by the Salafi call and is going ahead of the efforts to agree on one Islamist candidate." said Mohamed Nour spokesman of al-Nour in a statement.

Another leading Salafi group has yet to pronounce, but has been meeting leading candidates in recent days.

http://www.newsday.co.zw/article/2012-04-26-mubaraks-pm-is-back-in-egypt-election-race/

^^11 candidates appeal their ban, only one is allowed back into the race: Air Force chief and Prime Minister of Mubarak's junta

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Egypt approves presidential runners, voters perplexed

Egypt's election commission has announced 13 candidates are eligible to run in the forthcoming presidential election. The list includes ultraconservative Islamists, as well as ex-president Hosni Mubarak`s former ministers.

The fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood has nominated its strong Islamist candidate. The Islamic clerics from the Jurisprudence Commission for Rights and Reform have agreed on the candidacy of ultraconservative Mohammed Morsi. The man would battle for votes in May with a more moderate Islamist Abdel-Moneim Abol-Fotoh, a former Muslim Brotherhood member.

The presence of two strong Islamist candidates can end up splitting the Muslim voters. This gives a chance to secular candidates, like the former Arab League chief Amr Moussa, who warns against a dominant Islamist influence.

The use of religious slogans is strictly banned during the presidential race.

With the election less than a month away, and Egyptians have fresh concerns that the revolution was in vain, as the last Prime Minister under Hosni Mubarak, is back in the running for the top job in company of feared Islamist candidates.

Former PM Ahmed Shafik’s candidacy was blocked, under a new law newly adopted by the Islamist-dominated parliament. The law bans former Mubarak officials from taking part in the presidential race.

But on Wednesday the Presidential Election Commission approved his candidacy. Ahmed Shafik’s lawyers managed to prove the law was adopted after Shafik submitted all necessary documents to run in the election so the non-retroactivity of law should be observed. So the Commission referred the law to the Constitutional Court, and it reinstated Shafik.

After Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was toppled in February 2011 after 30 years of rule, his former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafik headed a provisional government. He had to leave the government after protests over his staying in power.

Many believe that being one of the ‘old guards’ Ahmed Shafik could find considerable support among the military that is actually preserving stability in the country right now.

Another old regime figure on the list is Amr Moussa, former Arab League chief, who served as Mubarak's foreign minister for a decade.

More than a dozen candidates registered to run for the Egyptian presidency. Some have been disqualified for various reasons. This has left many voters perplexed.

The greatest problem of the election is that the Egyptians really do not know where they stand at the moment. Some polls claim that up to 40 per cent of the voters do not know to whom they are going to give their voices.

There is great excitement in Egypt over the first free presidential election in the country in decades. There is also a sense of great disappointment and frustration over interference into the election system. Some even speak of postponing the election and firing the Electoral Commission.

Last Friday crowds gathered on Tahrir Square applying pressure to the ruling military council to go through the presidential election process democratically. People showed that they are more than willing to continue fighting if the military does not hand over the power to civilian authority.

http://rt.com/news/egypt-presidential-elections-candidates-009/

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